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« City Bakery Los Angeles | Main | Opening A Restaurant: the hours, the lists. »

08 September 2007

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i saw some fantastic art installations in the desert last week. my favorites were crude awakening (the sculptures of people worshipping the oil derrick which later erupted into flames) and big rig jig (the two oil rigs that were suspended in air). i enjoyed that we were allowed to contribute our own graffiti, as it were, to the temple, which was a beautiful piece of art in its own right.

Most definitely. the Sugimoto photographs at the DeYoung. Go before it's over on the 23d.

For anyone who loves the Getty, I'd absolutely recommend an East Coast visit to Dia:Beacon and Mass MoCA. Both in repurposed industrial factory space, both with the ability to show enormous 20th and 21st Century works. And for outdoor installation, especially the work of Calder, Henry Moore, and Mark DiSuvero, there's Storm King Art Center, about an hour north of New York City.

i've never been to the getty, though they've certainly been all over the news in recent years....

what kind of evidence of their troubles with aquired objects/ethics did you see?

and what did you think of how their exhibits were presented contextually? did you walk away with a good sense of where things came from?

you're a jetsetter, shuna! travel travel travel.

neato.

I've only been to the Getty once, but I fell in love with it immediately--art and nature combined with humans running through both like a colored thread. Here's an outside shot from it:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/14/13932417_dd8232cc40_m.jpg.

Two recent inspiring art shows at the Asian Art Museum of SF, one of which is closed, the other closes tomorrow. The closed one was 19th century Japanese woodblocks from Taiso Yoshitoshi. The still open (barely) show is "Tezuka: The Marvel of Manga," a collection of work from one of the pioneers of modern Manga. His drawings are expressive, daring, and imaginative. If only I could read Japanese!

When I lived in Ventura County I went to the Getty a few times. The buildings and grounds are fabulous; much of the permanent collection only so-so for me.

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